Almasha
Read the life history of Helen Keller. Arrange the details in, chronological order.

Helen Adams Keller was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Keller was not born blind and deaf; it was not until she was 19 months old that she contracted an illness. In March 1887, Anne Sullivan began to teach Helen to communicate by spelling words in her hand. Starting in May 1888, Keller attended the Perkins Institute for the Bind. In 1894, Helen Keller moved to New York to attend the Wright-Humason School for the Deaf. In 1896, she returned to Massachusetts and Keller entered. The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College. In 1904, at the age of 24, Keller graduated from Radcliffe, becoming the first deaf-blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree.

Keller wrote The World I Live In 1908 giving readers an insight into how she felt about the world. Out of the Dark, a series of essays on socialism was published in 1913. Her spiritual autobiography. My Religion was published in 1927.

Keller suffered a series of strokes in 1961 and spent the last years of her life at her home. On September 14, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In 1965 she was elected to the National Women's Hall of Fame at the New York World's Fair, Keller died in her sleep on June 1, 1968, at her home.

 

Difficulty: Medium

Born and Early Education (1880-1896):

Helen Adams Keller was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Helen Adams Keller was born on June 27. 1880, in Tuscumbia, Alabama. Keller was not born blind and deaf; it was not until she was 19 months old that she contracted an illness, In March 1887, Anne Sullivan began to teach Helen to communicate by spelling words into her hand. Starting in May 1888, Keller attended the Perkins Institute for the Blind. In 1894,

Higher Studies (1896-1900):

In 1896, she returned to Massachusetts and Keller entered The Cambridge School for Young Ladies before gaining admittance, in 1900, to Radcliffe College. In 1904, at the age of 24, Keller graduated from Radcliffe, becoming the first deaf-blind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree.

As a writer (1908- 1927):

Keller wrote The World I Live in 1908 giving readers an insight into how she felt about the world. Out of the Dark, a series of essays on socialism was published in 1913. Her spiritual autobiography. My Religion was published in 1927.

Suffered a series of strokes (1961):

Keller suffered a series of strokes in 1961 and spent the last years of her life at her home.

Presidential Award (1964):

On September 14, 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

National Women's Hall of Fame (1965):

In 1965 she was elected to the National Women's Hall of Fame at the New York World's Fair.

Death:

Keller died in her sleep on June 1, 1968, at her home.